Music and health
Somehow I walked along a quiet, old Moscow street and heard the wonderful sounds of Chopin from the window. I was surprised. Indeed, in this house is Russian research She…

Continue reading →

Piano Performance: A Brief Background
The history of professional musical performance began in those times when the first musical composition recorded with notes appeared. Performance is the result of the composer’s bilateral activities, expressing his…

Continue reading →

At the limit of hearing
The French otolaryngologist, Alfred Tomatis, was the first to systematically investigate the effect on the human psyche of high-frequency sounds. According to his theory, a child, floating in an amniotic…

Continue reading →

lying in the frequency

Musically gifted brain

Just as short-term learning increases the number of neurons that respond to sound, prolonged learning enhances the response of nerve cells and even causes physical changes in the brain. The reactions of the brain of professional musicians are significantly different from the reactions of non-musicians, and some areas of their brain are overdeveloped.

In 1998, Christo Pantev of the University of Münster in Germany showed that when musicians listen to the piano, the area of ​​the auditory zones reacting to music is 25% more than non-musicians. Children’s studies also confirm the suggestion that early musical experience facilitates “musical” brain development. In 2004, Antoine Shahin, Larry E. Roberts and Laurel J. Trainor from McMaster University in Ontario recorded the reactions of 4-5-year-old children to the sounds of pianos, violins and pure tones. Continue reading

Music in the head

Before modern neuroimaging techniques were developed, researchers studied the musical abilities of the brain, observing patients (including famous composers) with various disruptions in their activity due to injury or stroke. So, in 1933, the French composer Maurice Ravel developed symptoms of local brain degeneration – a disease accompanied by atrophy of certain sections of brain tissue. The composer’s mental abilities did not suffer: he remembered his old works and played scales well. But he could not compose music. Speaking about his alleged opera “Joan of Arc”, Ravel confessed: “The opera is in my head, I hear it, but I will never write it. It’s all over. I am no longer able to compose music.” He died four years after an unsuccessful neurosurgical operation. Continue reading

Will you be Einstein?

You are young, you consider yourself advanced, nightclubs are the best place to hang out after school or work. After – a feeling of well spent time, only now a fresh and clear thinking, like the influx of new forces and energy, is not observed.

Are you aware that modern electronic music, like rock, is referred to psychologists as aggressive non-drug drugs (the influence of the latter on the body is not necessary to explain)?

Just a few facts. Continue reading

Songs of Russian emigration, or, Russian song in exile
Already in 1919, the exodus of Russians from Russia began. The country has left several million people. The centers of Russian scattering around the world were Istanbul, and Prague, and…

...

Songs of bondage, prisons and penal servitude: from Pushkin to the Circle
Indestructible pity, "mercy for the fallen", including even the most inveterate robbers and murderers, gave rise to a special song layer. And let other refined aesthetes fastidiously turn their nose…

...

The history of the Gregorian chant: the recitative of the prayer will be echoed by the choral
Gregorian chorales, Gregorian chants ... Most of us automatically associate these words with the Middle Ages (and rightly so). But the roots of this liturgical chant go back to the…

...

Russian choral music of the X-XVI centuries
Russian choral music of the 10th – 16th centuries is an important layer that serves as the basis for the further development of Russian music and culture as a whole.…

...