Russian choral music of the X-XVI centuries
Russian choral music of the 10th – 16th centuries is an important layer that serves as the basis for the further development of Russian music and culture as a whole.…

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One glance at a person who has in his memory a painful experience, actualized in the present, is enough to determine the presence of this experience. Usually, a person tries…

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Ode to joy or sorrow?
Researchers study not only the processing by the brain of the “acoustic” component of music, but also the processes by which it affects people emotionally. In one of these works,…

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Songs of the October Revolution

No matter how belated curses are sent to Lenin and the Bolsheviks, no matter how rampant demonic, satanic forces the October Revolution is declared by some pseudo-historians, the book of the American journalist John Reed is nevertheless named as precisely as possible – “Ten days that shook the world.” It is the world, and not only Russia. And the songs were sung by others – draft, marching, and not decadently tearful or romantically languid. “He raised his Dubin to his enemies!” One of the things that seemed to anticipate, bless, and historically anticipate the social upheaval occurred, of course, was Dubinushka. Fyodor Chaliapin himself did not disdain to perform the songs of the October Revolution, for which he, in fact, suffered – the greatest order of Emperor Nicholas II was ordered to “remove the tramp from the imperial theaters.” The poet V. Mayakovsky then writes: “Both the song and the verse are a bomb and a banner.” So, Dubinushka became such a bomb song. Refined aesthetes frowned and hurriedly muffled their ears – just like once venerable academics squeamishly turned away from I. Repin’s painting “Barge Haulers on the Volga”. By the way, the song also speaks of them, the still silent, formidable Russian protest starts from them, which later turned into two revolutions with a small interval.

Here is this great song performed by Chaliapin: LIKE BUT NOT ONE FACE! The stylistics and lexical structure of the songs of the October Revolution have a number of characteristic features that make them recognizable: at the thematic level – the desire for immediate action, which is expressed by the verbs of imperative mood: “build”, “let’s go”, “get stronger”, “fly”, etc. ; the frequent use of the common “we” instead of the narrowly personal “I” is already in the first lines of popular songs: “We’ll boldly go to battle”, “Boldly, comrades, keep up”, “we all left the people”, “Our engine, fly forward ” etc.; a set of ideological stamps characteristic of this transitional period: “labor is the ruler of the world”, the dawn of a new life, the “calloused hand” of the proletariat, “the last, mortal battle”, the strength of the fighting spirit, the “kingdom of freedom”, the desire to fan the “world fire” and etc .; sharp ideological demarcation between “ours” and “strangers”, “ours” and “not ours”: “white army, black baron” – “The Red Army is stronger than all”; energetic, marching, marching rhythm with a meaningful, easily remembered chorus; finally, maximalism, expressed in the willingness to die as one in the struggle for a just cause. AND WRITTEN AND WRITTEN …

The song “The White Army, the Black Baron”, written in hot pursuit of the October Revolution by the poet P. Grigoriev and composer S. Pokrass, first contained a mention of Trotsky, which then disappeared for censorship reasons, and in 1941 it was already modified with the name Stalin. It was popular in Spain and Hungary, it was hated by white emigrants: WITHOUT GERMANS it was not dispensed … The story of the song “Young Guard” is interesting, the verses of which are attributed to the Komsomol poet A. Bezymensky: In reality, Bezymensky was only a translator and not inconsiderate interpreter of the original German text of the poet Julius Mozen in a later version of another German – A. Ayldermann. This poem is dedicated to the memory of the leader of the uprising against Napoleonic tyranny Andreas Gofer, which took place in the distant 1809. The original song is called “Zu Mantua in Banden”. Here is a version of the times of the German Democratic Republic: From the verses of the First World War “Heard, Grandfathers”, another song of the October Revolution grew up – “We’ll boldly go into battle”. They also sang it in the Volunteer White Army, but, of course, with different words. So there is no need to talk about one author.

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